The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe

The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe

We invite you to attend our annual spring show. This year the students of the St. Michael’s Theatre Ensemble will perform “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”. The production is directed by Christina Johnston and designed by Ellyn Eaves-Hileman. Everyone is welcome to attend! “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” is based on C.S. Lewis’ first book of The Chronicles of Narnia, in an adaptation by Adrian Mitchell. While staying in a remote country manor to escape the London Blitz, the four Pevenzie children discover a magic wardrobe that allows them to pass into Narnia, a world inhabited by talking animals and ruled by the White Witch.  Since coming into power, the Witch has held Narnia in an eternal winter, never permitting Christmas or spring, and turning her enemies to stone with a wave of her wand. All of Narnia has been waiting for the return of Aslan, the Lion and Lord of Narnia, to overcome the Witch and reawaken the land. The children join together with Aslan, as they fight to outwit the Witch and restore peace to Narnia, learning the power of love and loyalty along the way. Performances are scheduled for Thursday, March 2nd at 7:00pm, Friday, March 3rd at 7:00pm, and Saturday, March 4th at 2:00pm. Free and open to the public. The performances will be held in the Hill House Arts and Athletics Center on the campus of St. Michael’s Country Day School, 180 Rhode Island Ave, Newport. We hope to see you...
Norman Bird Sanctuary visits Early Childhood

Norman Bird Sanctuary visits Early Childhood

A visit with the Preschool and Prekindergarten Mark from the Norman Bird Sanctuary came to the preschool and prekindergarten for our monthly visit .  He read Bats at the Beach and talked about mammals.  Mark also showed the children an African spikey mouse named Mo and a bunny named Andre, who is a lopped eared mix.  All of the children loved petting...
Electric Houses in Grade 4

Electric Houses in Grade 4

The 4th graders exhibited their “electric” structures for their parents on Wednesday morning in their classrooms. This was the culminating project of learning about electric circuits in science that they started the unit in September. They partnered up to create a structure of their choice (igloo, treehouse, medieval castle and Star Wars’ “Deathstar” to name a few). Following a rubric, they had to have four switches that carried electricity to light bulbs inside a well planned out and designed cardboard structure. Not only did this project show persistence in getting all the circuits to work, but collaboration with a partner and positive thinking in making it all come...
Learning about the United States

Learning about the United States

State Feast in Grade 3 During their study of the United States, the third graders completed travel logs on two states, and then chose a third state on which they became an expert.  The students researched the industry, products, landmarks, major cities, and symbols of their state and then each child chose a unique way to present what they learned. They created three dimensional displays, keynote presentations, iMovies, games and tri-folds.  Other projects included sewing state pillows, designing tee shirts and learning the Fifty States Song Set to Rhyme which, as part of decade long tradition, they will sing at an upcoming whole school assembly. To culminate this study the third graders had a State feast!  From the red, white and blue decorations, to the awesome food representing products from each state, it was a wonderful way to celebrate all their hard work. Some of the foods they feasted on included huckleberries from Montana, salmon from Oregon, a king cake from Louisiana, key lime pie from Florida, lobster cakes from Maine, and cheese from Wisconsin. Thank you to all the parents who provided these delicious offerings and who helped during the feast!   State Presentations As a culmination of their study of the United States, each third grader became an expert on one state.  They researched the industry, products, landmarks, major cities, symbols and interesting facts about their  state and then chose a unique way to present what they learned. They created three dimensional displays, keynote presentations, iMovies, games and tri-folds and shared their projects on Wednesday with students in other grades and their parents. The third graders also impressed...
Shadow a Student Day!

Shadow a Student Day!

…to learn from the child, we must have empathy, and empathy grows as we learn.” Alice Miller Shadow Day Reflection by Mollie Williams Before I taught in Middle School, I was a Lower School teacher at a private K-8 grade school in Baltimore. My days as a third grade homeroom teacher were full of joy and laughter. I got hugs all day long, and I received love letters and drawings from my students, and appreciative gifts from parents on a frequent basis. Life was good. On the eve of my new role as Dean of Students in the Middle School, I thought to myself “What the heck have I done?!!” I braced myself for the stereotypical eye rolling, avoidance of student/teacher relationships, attitudes, and self-centered behavior. While the hugs and love letters did indeed cease, I made meaningful connections with middle school students after about a month of investment. I quickly learned that middle school students are just as needy, if not needier, than those adorable lower school students….they just don’t always know how to show it or express it. They need us more than ever to believe in them and connect with them. They so want to please us, and a pat on the back, a smile, or a compliment goes a long way. While I enjoyed my time teaching in the Lower School, I have felt called to Middle School; I want to advocate for children who are trapped between childhood and young adulthood, who need love, support, and guidance. On Monday, February 6, I participated in the Shadow a Student Challenge by shadowing sixth grade student,...

From the Desk of Mr. Zurn

On Schools of the Future Tony Wagner’s official title is Expert in Residence at Harvard University’s Innovation Lab. He is a well-known speaker in education circles for his thoughts on building schools of the future to prepare our students for changes in the workforce. He makes the case that the students most likely to succeed in schools in the past are not necessarily the students most likely to succeed in the future. In the video below, Tony proposes that educators need to focus in three primary areas in defining schools of the future: What academic content do I want students to master? What are the skills that matter the most and how do I assess them? How do I develop the intrinsic motivators through play, passion and purpose that will ultimately be the most important indicator for future success? St. Michael’s has a long history of excellence in identifying and developing the content and skills that matter. Area high schools seek out our students knowing that they are exceptionally well prepared for the rigors of challenging academic programs. Course content and student skills have been mapped by teachers for each class at St. Michael’s and our annually updated school Primer charts out major content areas for parents and newcomers to the community. In recent years, we have paid more and more attention to the intrinsic motivators that inspire our students to be curious, take charge learners who will continuously acquire the skills and knowledge they will need to be successful throughout their lives. School-wide initiatives in a variety of areas focus students on choosing challenges for which they find personal...